Newfields

Vacancy: Paralegal Intern

Author Archive

Vacancy: Paralegal Intern

Posted on: October 18th, 2022 by newfieldsEditor

Join our team

Newfields is a niche law firm focused on delivering practical immigration solutions to businesses and sporting organisations, the education, health and legal sectors, and to private individuals.

The role

We are looking for a student intern who can assist clients and support the wider team at Newfields to deliver on behalf of Welsh Government an immigration advisory service that assists EU Citizens resident in Wales post-Brexit.

The role will be supervised and shall cover the following responsibilities:

 Skills required

Additional information

This placement will be hosted at the firm’s offices in Cardiff or Bristol (the location to accommodate the successful candidate).

Applicants must be in a position to commit at least two regular mornings or afternoons per week.

The internship will be for a period of 3 months initially, commencing in December with opportunities to begin earlier.

Apply now

The closing date for receiving applications is Wednesday 2 November 2022.

Expressions of interest should be sent by email to info@newfieldslaw.com or alternatively by post to Newfields, Fifth Floor, James William House, Cardiff CF10 3BD.

Vacancy: Marketing & Social Media Intern

Posted on: October 18th, 2022 by newfieldsEditor

Join our team

Newfields is a niche law firm focused on delivering practical immigration solutions to businesses and sporting organisations, the education, health and legal sectors, and to private individuals.

The role

We are looking for a student intern who can offer support to Newfields to enhance the firm’s brand through various social media channels.

The role will be supervised and shall involve working with the firm’s external suppliers, to cover the following responsibilities:

 Skills required

Additional information

This placement will be hosted at the firm’s offices in Cardiff or Bristol (the location to accommodate the successful candidate), with opportunities to or undertake tasks remotely.

Applicants must be in a position to commit at least two regular mornings or afternoons per week.

The internship will be for a period of 3 months initially, commencing in December with opportunities to begin earlier.

Apply now

The closing date for receiving applications is Wednesday 2 November 2022.

Expressions of interest should be sent by email to info@newfieldslaw.com or alternatively by post to Newfields, Fifth Floor, James William House, Cardiff CF10 3BD.

EUSS: Expired Identity Documents

Posted on: February 18th, 2021 by newfieldsEditor

Several countries have extended the validity period of identity documents in response to Covid-19.

Making an application to the EU Settlement Scheme normally requires the applicant to use a valid and in-date identity document. An identity document can be a passport, national identity card or biometric residence card.

As a result of covid-19, people are finding it hard to renew their expired passports due to embassy closures and reduced appointment availability. Therefore, some countries have extended the validity period of identity documents.

The table below outlines which countries have made changes for the relevant documents and the impact on the expiry date. This table can also be found on the gov.uk website under the EUSS caseworker guidance.

 

Country Document Changes to expiry date
Bulgaria Passport and national identity card Any document which has expired since 13 March 2020 is to be accepted as valid until 31 January 2021
Croatia Passport and national identity card Any document expiring on or after 13 March 2020 is to be treated as having no expiry date
Hungary Passport and national identity card Any document expiring between 11 March 2020 – 3 July 2020 is to be treated as valid until 8 February 2021 + 60 days

Any document expiring on or after 4 November 2020 is to be treated as valid until 8 February 2021 + 60 days

Italy Passport and national identity card The expiry date has been newly extended by law until 30 April 2021. This makes the document still valid for proving the holder’s identity. However, it cannot be used as a travel document
Portugal Passport and national identity card Any document expiring after 26 February 2020 is to be accepted as valid until 31 March 2021
Romania Passport and national identity card Any document expiring on or after 1 March 2020 is to be accepted as valid until 90 days following the end of the state of alert in Romania
Slovakia National identity card Any identity card expiring between 9 April 2020 – 30 April 2020 is to be accepted as valid until one month following the official termination of the state of crisis situation by the Government of the Slovak Republic

Any identity card expiring between 1 May 2020 – 31 May 2020 is to be accepted as valid until 2 months following the official termination of the state of crisis situation by the Government of the Slovak Republic

Any identity card expiring between 1 June 2020 – 30 June 2020 is to be accepted as valid until 3 months following the official termination of the state of crisis situation by the Government of the Slovak Republic

Any card expiring on or after 1 July 2020 until the official termination of the state of crisis situation by the Government of the Slovak Republic is to be accepted as valid until 4 months following the official termination of the state of crisis situation by the Government of the Slovak Republic

Spain National identity card Any card expiring between 14 March 2020 and 13 March 2021 is to be accepted as valid until 13 March 2021

 

Please get into contact with us if you have any further questions regarding the above update or if you are needing assistance in applying to the EU Settlement Scheme. Our contact details are info@newfieldslaw.com – 02921 690 049.

EU Settlement Scheme: FAQs

Posted on: February 12th, 2021 by newfieldsEditor

Newfields Law, along with several other organisations, has been funded by the Welsh Government to provide free advice to EU citizens and their family members living in Wales, who are applying to the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS).

This article has been written to answer your most frequently asked questions regarding making an application to the EUSS. If you require any further information or have additional queries, please email info@newfieldslaw.com.

 

  1. I don’t have a National Insurance number, what documents can I use to prove my residency in the UK?

You do not need to have a national insurance number to make an application to the EUSS.

If you do have a National Insurance number, then this will be useful to input into your application as the data attached to your National Insurance number can show your residence in the UK.

However, if you don’t have a national insurance number, or your personal national insurance records are incomplete, you can provide additional evidence of residence to cover any gaps. Examples of documents that can be used to prove residency in the UK are:

  • Payslips, P60, P45, contract or letter from employer
  • Enrolment letter from the University
  • Bank statement/s
  • Utility bills
  • GP registration letter
  • Council tax bills
  • Pension Documents
  • Tenancy agreement & corresponding rent payments
  • Boarding pass and flight/ferry/train booking if arriving close to 31st Dec 2020

It is important to note that the documents must include your name and UK address. If you are providing bank statements, then you must show transactions in each statement for the evidence to be accepted.

If you can’t get any of the documents in the list above, try to find any other document with your name and UK address or a letter from any support organisation that might be helping you with a particular problem e.g., support worker, housing officer, Citizens’ Advice, or charity.

 

  1. Do children need to make their own application to the EUSS?

Yes.

It is a common misconception that children do not need to apply to the EUSS as their parents have their own status, however, this is not the case.

Children do need to make their own application to the EUSS, which can be made by the parent, on behalf of the child. We advise for the parent to make their EUSS application first, which generates a unique application reference number starting with 3434. This can then be input into the child’s application which will connect the two together. This means that a child can acquire the same EUSS status as their parent. The parent will need to upload a copy of the child’s birth certificate as evidence of the parent/child relationship. The birth certificate must show the names of the parents and the child.

Here is a useful video link created by Freemovement explaining a step-by-step process for making a child’s application to the EUSS – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CMEhJ4Ox5s.

 

  1. What is the latest guidance given to EUSS applicants with absences from the UK due to coronavirus?

If you currently hold or are eligible for pre-settled status only, then you must maintain continuous residency in the UK to be eligible for settled status in the future.

To be eligible for settled status, you need to show the Home Office that you have been continuously resident in the UK for at least 5 consecutive years.

You will be considered to have been continuously resident if you have spent at least 6 months in every 12-months of each of those qualifying five years living in the UK.

There are some exceptions to this where the Home Office will allow you to be outside the UK for a single period of up to 12 months. These reasons include:

  1. Serious illness
  2. Study
  3. Self-isolating

This will only be considered an important reason where you are, or were, under quarantine conditions, for example:

i) when ill with coronavirus yourself,

ii) sharing a house with someone ill with coronavirus,

iii) when required to self-isolate as a result of being, or being in contact with someone who is, in a vulnerable or high-risk category

If you have been prevented from travelling back to the UK due to coronavirus you should provide a supporting letter with your application outlining the details and the dates you were ill, were in quarantine or if your previous travel booking was cancelled.

If you have been living outside of the UK because of the Coronavirus, the Home Office has said that it will accept a single absence of up to 12 months that was because of being ill, needing to self-isolate or quarantine, or because there were travel restrictions that prevented you from returning to the UK. Therefore, a single period of more than 6 months, but no more than 12 months, during your 5-year continuous qualifying period means that it may not cause you to break your continuity of residence in the UK. Students enrolled at a UK college or university but who have been studying remotely outside the UK for a single period of up to 12 months because of Coronavirus will still be continuously resident.

If you had a single or multiple absence of more than 6 months, but no more than 12 months, and the reason for your absence was not related to coronavirus, this will likely break your continuous qualifying period. If this is the case, then you must provide evidence of reasoning for your absence from the UK. In these circumstances, you may need to restart your 5-year qualifying period towards settled status and you will need to have returned to the UK before the end of the transition period i.e., 31st December 2020.

Latest published guidance found on the gov.uk website was issued on the 15th December 2020 which is correct for the date of publishing this FAQ article.

The3million have created an ‘absence calculator’ which is an effective tool in calculating your absences from the UK for your EUSS application. Please follow this link and scroll to the end of the page where you’ll find a link to download an excel spreadsheet of the absence calculator.

 

  1. How do I change my pre-settled status to settled status?

Once you have been granted pre-settled status and have reached 5 years continuous residence in the UK, you must make an application to convert your pre-settled status into settled status. You must complete this application before your pre-settled status expires. Your pre-settled status will expire 5 years from the date it was granted to you.

For example: you arrived in the UK March 2019 and made an application for pre-settled status upon arrival. Therefore, by March 2024, you will have reached 5 years continuous residence and must convert your pre-settled status to settled status, to reflect your time spent in the UK.

To be eligible to apply for settled status in the future, you must spend at least 6 months within any 12-month qualifying period in the UK. Therefore, you must be careful to minimise any time that you spend outside the UK until you are granted settled status. It is also important to note that new criminal convictions that that occur during this time may affect your eligibility for holding a future settled status.

Please see the attached flyers which have been designed to give informative advice and a checklist for your current pre-settled or settled status. The flyers are available in English, Polish, Czech, Romanian, Slovakian and Portuguese.

Pre-settled status:

Settled status:

 

  1. I am an EU citizen starting my residence in the UK on or after 1st January 2021 – can I still apply to the EUSS?

To be eligible to apply under the EUSS, you will need to have arrived and been living in the UK by 31st December 2020, the end of the transition period. If you have arrived by this date, you have until 30th June 2021 to apply to the EUSS.

If you are an EU Citizen who has arrived in the UK after the 31st December 2020, you will likely need to apply for a visa under the points-based system. However, if you have EU family members who arrived in the UK before 31st December 2020, you may be eligible to apply under the EUSS as a joining family member through an EUSS Family Permit. Please feel free to get in touch with us for more details on this.

 

  1. The EU Exit Document Check App isn’t working, what can I do to make an application?

The app is used to verify your identity and nationality by scanning information contained on the biometric chip inside your passport or national ID card. It is the quickest and most straightforward way to submit an application to the EUSS. If the EU Exit Document Check App is not working, try following the steps below:

  • Delete and redownload the app.
  • Try using the app on a friend/family member’s phone.

Check on the gov.uk guidance if your phone is compatible with the app. For example, if you have an iPhone, it will need to be the iPhone 7 or above.

If after following these steps you still cannot use the App or you do not have the correct device, you can complete the online application form and send your passport or national ID card in the post to the Home Office. Instructions about how to post your document safely are available at the end of the application form.

You will also need post your ID document to the Home Office if it does not contain a biometric chip or the chip is damaged.  You can start the application without using the App by visiting https://www.gov.uk/settled-status-eu-citizens-families/applying-for-settled-status.

 

  1. Do I need to declare my previous and current criminal convictions in my EUSS application?

In most cases, yes.

It is important that you declare any criminal convictions you may have in your EUSS application. This includes any criminal convictions you have received in the UK or overseas. If you fail to disclose a criminal conviction, this may potentially lead to a refusal on the grounds of deception.

You are not required to declare:

  • Cautions
  • Spent offences
  • Alternatives to prosecution, such as fixed penalty notices for speeding

If you don’t know whether to include a conviction it is always better to declare it. If you need to find out more about your criminal convictions, you can obtain information about your UK criminal record, and some overseas criminal records, by making a Subject Access Request to the Criminal Records Office.

If you have a pending prosecution, your EUSS application may be paused until the outcome of the prosecution is known. Even if you have a pending prosecution it is important that you submit your EUSS application before the deadline of 30th June 2021.

An EUSS application may be referred to Immigration Enforcement where you have been convicted and sentenced to imprisonment in the last five years, if your prison sentence was for 12 months or more, if you have had multiple convictions within the last three years, or if your criminal conviction was for a violent offence.

Criminal convictions are dealt with on a case-by-case basis so there may be other situations where an EUSS application would be referred to Immigration Enforcement. If you have any previous or current criminal conviction and are looking to apply to the EUSS, we recommend that you contact us to discuss your situation.

 

  1. How do I convert my EEA Biometric Residence Card (BRC) to an EUSS BRC?

Current BRC’s held by non-EU family members and those with retained or derivative rights that were issued under EEA Regulations will still be valid and in operation until the 30th June 2021. However, after the 30th June 2021, you must have converted your BRC to be issued under the EUSS.

Follow this link which provides you with the application process on how you can transfer from your EEA BRC to be an EUSS BRC.

Also, you are no longer able to replace your BRC issued under the EEA Regulations if it has been lost, stolen, expired or damaged. If this is the case, you will need to apply to the EUSS. Once applied, and your status has been granted, you will then be issued a BRC within 10 working days from the date of your application being granted.

Applying to EUSS using your BRC

Follow this link to make an application to the EUSS.

Applications for the EUSS usually close on 30th June 2021. However, you might be able to apply later if both of the following apply:

  • You are a spouse, civil partner, or unmarried partner of an EU, EEA, or Swiss citizen who themselves is already living in the UK by 31st December 2020; or
  • You are child under 21 years old of an EU, EEA, or Swiss citizen or if you are 21 years old or over, you are dependant; and
  • You are applying to join them in the UK on or after 1st January 2021

If you are applying to join your family member in the UK, who was themselves living in the UK before 1st January 2021, you may be able to apply to the EUSS. Your close family member must both:

  • be a citizen of an EU country, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, or Liechtenstein (or a British citizen who lived with you in one of these countries)
  • have been living in the UK before 1st January 2021

To be eligible to apply to the EU Settlement as a joining family member from outside the UK, you must be either:

  • be a citizen of an EU country, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, or Liechtenstein with a valid biometric passport or ID card; or
  • have a relevant UK residence card with a biometric chip such as a biometric residence card, a permanent residence card, or a derivative residence card

If you don’t have a biometric document listed above you can Otherwise, you will need to apply for a free family permit to come to the UK. Once you are in the UK, you can apply to the EUSS.

 

  1. I’m an EU citizen and married to a British Citizen, do I still need to apply to the EUSS?

Yes.

Again, this is a common misconception that if you are married to a British Citizen then you do not need to apply to the EUSS. However, this is not the case.

Therefore, as an EU citizen, you will apply to the EUSS in your own right and rely on your EU nationality and residence in the UK.

 

Bitesize Immigration Webinars for UK Sport

Posted on: February 10th, 2021 by newfieldsEditor

Three 15-minute videos for the sporting sector which discuss the post-Brexit Immigration Rules that changed on 1st December 2020.

 

At Newfields, we recently presented a series of free webinars to almost 200 sporting bodies, clubs, athletes, agents and representatives which summarised the new immigration rules for sportspeople. We have re-created each session to ensure the information can be accessed by those who were not able to attend the originals, and to those who wish to re-familiarise themselves with the information we provided.

To view the videos, please follow the links below:

Please do get in touch if you have any questions arising from the issues we cover in the videos. Our contact details can be found at the end of each session and on our website.

New UK Immigration Rules: Free event

Posted on: December 4th, 2020 by newfieldsEditor

With the UK immigration rules changing from the 1 January 2020, it’s never been more important for law firms to consider their offering for commercial clients and to support employers.

Glyn Lloyd, Partner at Cardiff-based immigration specialist firm Newfields, explains below how his firm is supporting large regional law firms across Wales and is able to collaborate with you to enhance your offering and help clients overcome the challenges faced in a post Brexit world.

Newfields, The Law Society Wales & Legal News Wales are also hosting a FREE online event to explain the new immigration rules and the ending of freedom of movement on the 10 December (10-11am).

Click here to book

 

How Newfields immigration expertise can enhance your firms commercial offering

Relocating individuals to the UK – ranging from senior management to key skilled staff – involves many moving parts. As the new UK immigration rules come into force on 1 January 2021, law firms should be looking to include robust, commercially-focused immigration advice to enhance their existing business and employment law offering.

Newfields, founded by Glyn Lloyd, already works with a number of major regional law firms in Wales to offer specialist, commercially-focused immigration advice with a human touch. It’s proud of its ability to work in synergy with other law firms to meet the diverse immigration needs of their clients, and to support businesses through the Brexit transition and beyond.

Supporting the legal sector
Immigration law is complex, changeable, and getting it wrong has significant repercussions for both employers and visa holders. Newfields’ business-focused approach, twinned with the challenging regulatory landscape makes the firm an attractive collaborative partner to other law firms to provide immigration services for their commercial clients.

Newfields collaborates with employment and corporate teams, advising on hiring overseas staff and assessing worker rights through to due diligence arising from M&As that involve transfers of non-EU (and, from 1 January 2021, non-British) employees.

Newfields reports that most employers are still grappling with the new UK immigration rules that will require a change of approach in only a few weeks’ time.

We invite CDLS members to join us for this bespoke, free event 
and encourage you to share this invitation with your colleagues.

 

Free Webinar: Brexit & the new UK immigration rules: insight for lawyers

10 December, 10-11am (FREE & online)

Newfields, in association with The Law Society Wales and Legal News Wales, is hosting a FREE, online seminar for law firms, and, if of interest, their clients, to explain the new rules and what they need to know.

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

 

What makes Newfields different?
Aside from its specialist focus, Newfields is a firm that prioritises client outcome without resorting to traditional billing structures, making it nimble and open to new ideas and collaborations. Its incredibly diverse team is grounded to delivering excellent legal services. Business profit is secondary. It understands the demands of the legal profession and takes pride in delivering responsive, holistic and commercially oriented advice, with certainty on costs and strategy from the outset.

Brexit: how we can help
On 1 January 2021, most EU workers entering the UK from January will need a visa which is ‘sponsored’ by an employer that has a Home Office sponsor licence. The work must be skilled and meet minimum salary thresholds. Newfields can assist law firms to prepare their clients for Brexit, offering sponsor licence applications in readiness for the new changes, and advising on how the new immigration landscape will affect their clients’ staffing.

Earlier this year, Newfields was appointed by the Welsh Government to deliver an all-Wales legal advice service for EU citizens and their family members. The firm works with other public advice providers to assist those requiring pre-settled or settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

 

Our Expertise:

  • Hiring workers from outside the UK
  • Right to work checks and immigration compliance audits
  • Sponsor licencing including Intra-Company Transfers
  • Training on all aspects of immigration regulation
  • Private client and family immigration
How we can support your firm:

  • White label or referral arrangement
  • External client-facing training, virtually or in person
  • Standalone articles and appropriate updates
  • Client or in-house training seminars and presentations
  • Inclusion within procurement exercise to complement existing offerings
  • Dovetailing strategic and practical advice within a broader instruction, including due diligence
Can we help you?
If you’d like to speak to us about how Newfields can work collaboratively with your law firm, to enhance your client services without conflict, or to strengthen a procurement or bid-tender, please contact Glyn Lloyd, Partner, on 02921 690 049, email glyn@newfieldslaw.com Or visit newfieldslaw.com

Tougher criminality rules for EU Citizens

Posted on: November 24th, 2020 by newfieldsEditor

The Home Office have announced tougher border controls for EU citizens entering the UK from the 1st January 2021.

The new criminality rules will be enforced when free movement ends, and the UK officially leaves the EU. The government has introduced new criminality rules which will purportedly make the country a safer environment and implement a firmer and fairer immigration system that treats everybody equally.

Current law

The UK currently follows EU regulations on criminality. It permits EU ex-offenders to reside in the UK even where they would have been rejected based on non-EU visa criminality requirements. Existing EU rules enable the Home Office to restrict a person’s free movement rights if it can be shown that they hold a genuine, present, and sufficiently serious threat which affects a fundamental interest of society.

Changes to the law

From 1st January 2021, foreign criminals will face tougher border controls. The Home Office have announced that those who have been sentenced to at least a year in prison will be barred from entering the UK.

The new firmer approach to the immigration system has been designed to treat all citizens equally, regardless of EU citizenship. All offences will be considered whether they have been committed in the UK or overseas. Other changes include the following:

Who is not affected by the new changes?

EU citizens protected by the Withdrawal Agreement (for example, those who have either pre-settled or settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme) are not covered by the changes. However, if an individual protected by the Withdrawal Agreement commits a crime, for example a crime which results in a prison sentence of at least a year from the 1st January 2021, whether in the UK or overseas, their current status could be revoked.

The UK government is enforcing these changes so that the UK’s immigration system becomes more secure and safer for those living within the UK, which extends to the police having more powers to govern the changes and protect the public. The extended powers can be found under the Extradition Bill which is currently in the last stages of receiving Royal Assent.

Bitesize Immigration webinars for UK sport announced

Posted on: November 16th, 2020 by newfieldsEditor

Newfields is hosting three 30-minute updates on changes to the rules taking effect from 1 December 2020.

Register for free

 

Three 30-minute updates on changes to the rules taking effect from 1 December ‘20. Click to register

香港的英國國民(海外)

Posted on: September 8th, 2020 by newfieldsEditor

鑑於中國政府決定在香港實施新的《國家安全法》,英國政府為英國國民(海外)(BN(O))及其親屬製定了特定入境英國及在當地居留的途徑。本文章將解釋取得全新香港 BN(O) 簽證的途徑,並簡述潛在 BN(O) 簽證申請人須有甚麼資格要求  

全新 BN(O) 簽證將於 20211 月開放予BN(O) 公民及其直系親屬申請,為其提供在英國居住、工作和接受長期教育的權利。BN(O) 公民目前僅獲允許以訪客身份在英國逗留 6 個月,且能夠進行的活動也受到限制。

從明年開始,申請人將能在英國境內外申請此簽證。進入英國和/或在當地居留的許可最初為 30 個月,然後可以再延長 30 個月。或者, 英國政府亦可能授予單次的 5 年期限居留許可。在英國居留 5 年後,個人將有機會在英國定居(也稱為「無限期居留許可」),也可以在取得 ILR 身份的 12 個月後選擇入籍英國國籍。

申請資格 

BN(O) 簽證申請人需要顯示:

– 他們擁有 BN(O) 身份(但不需要有效的 BN(O) 護照 – 過期護照便足夠)

– 他們常居香港;和

– 他們經濟上能應付在英國居住及生活至少 6 個月。

申請程序是電子化的,而成功的申請人將獲得「網上電子簽證」。申請該簽證將涉及一項費用,而相關費用將在適當時候公佈。

在取得香港 BN(O) 簽證前進入英國

雖然香港 BN(O) 簽證申請將從 2021 年 1 月全面開始,但英國政府了解許多 BN(O) 公民可能希望提早前往英國。此等個人有機會在英國邊境申請許可,透過正常規例外的一般申請類別酌情入境。  若申請人符合以上資格,邊境部隊軍官將有權酌情考慮授予 BN(O) 公民以及任何隨行家屬為期 6 個月的特定許可。

在英國的 BN(O) 公民

目前可能有一些 BN(O) 公民正處身英國,並希望申請香港 BN(O) 簽證。從 2021 年 1 月開始,利用其他移民類別入境並身處英國的 BN(O) 公民將能夠在英國境內將簽證轉換為香港 BN(O) 簽證。

你現在可作出甚麼準備?

英國政府尚未就相關簽證費用或電子申請程序發佈任何資訊。然而,英國境內外的 BN(O) 公民現應確保自己擁有有效或過期的 BN(O) 護照以考慮其簽證資格。我們建議他們除了收集證明自身有能力在英國生活的文件外,還應開始收集其常居香港的證據。

我們能提供甚麼協助?

在 Newfields,我們可為個別人士提供文件清單,並檢查您所收集的證明以評估其是否符合 BN(O) 簽證要求。

若對此簽證申請途徑感興趣,請與我們聯絡,一旦英國政府公布了與電子應用程式相關的更多資訊,我們將與您聯絡。我們將為您完成該申請,並在對申請有疑問時與內政部聯絡。在接下來的幾年,我們將與您保持聯絡以引導您取得無限期居留許可和英國公民身份,如有任何相關規定有所變更而影響你的移民身份,我們將會通知你。我們的支援將延伸至受供養家庭成員,並會透過我們的可靠網絡為您推介英國的受監管律師。從轉讓、繼任計劃到商業與公司事務,他們可以就其他法律領域提供建議。

 

Newfields 是一家由專業律師組成的優質律師事務所,提供實用且價格相宜的移民解決方案。      如欲查詢更多有關本

律師行之資訊請瀏覽 :- http://newsfields.com

 

顧問律師 王倩旎

jennie@newfieldslaw.com

+ 852 9821 0568 (HK);

+ 44 7896910897 (UK)

 

合夥人 葛霖磊 (Glyn Lloyd)

glyn@newfieldslaw.com

+ 447792402489 (UK)

 

British Nationals (Overseas) in Hong Kong

Posted on: September 8th, 2020 by newfieldsEditor

In light of the Chinese government’s decision to impose a new National Security Law on Hong Kong, the UK government has created a bespoke immigration route for British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) citizens, and their dependants, to enter or remain in the UK. This article explains the new Hong Kong BN(O) visa route and provides an overview of the eligibility requirements for prospective BN(O) visa applicants.  

The new BN(O) visa route will open from January 2021 and will provide BN(O) citizens, and their immediate family members, with the right to live, work and take up long term study in the UK. BN(O) citizens are currently only permitted to stay in the UK as visitors for up to 6 months and are restricted in the activities they can undertake.

From next year, applicants will be able to apply for this visa either from outside or inside the UK. Permission to enter and/or remain in the UK will be granted for an initial period of 30 months and will be extendable by a further 30 months, or alternatively a single period of 5 years will be granted. Individuals will have the opportunity to settle in the UK (otherwise known as ‘indefinite leave to remain’) once they have accrued 5 years of UK residency, with options for British Citizenship after spending a further 12 month period with ILR status.

Eligibility 

BN(O) visa applicants will need to show:

The application will be digital and successful applicants will be issued a ‘digital online visa’. This visa route will involve a fee which will be announced in due course.

Entering the UK before the Hong Kong BN(O) visa is available

Whilst the Hong Kong BN(O) visa route will become fully operational from January 2021, the UK government recognises a number of BN(O) citizens may wish to travel to the UK at an earlier date. These individuals have the opportunity to apply at the UK border for permission to enter in a general category outside the scope of the normal rules.  The decision whether or not to grant permission will be at the discretion of Border Force Officers who may consider granting BN(O) citizens, and any accompanying dependants specific permission for a period of 6 months, provided they meet the eligibility criteria listed above.

BN(O) citizens in the UK

There may be BN(O) citizens who are currently in the UK and may wish to apply for the Hong Kong BN(O) visa. From January 2021, BN(O) citizens already in the UK in a different immigration category will be able to switch to the Hong Kong BN(O) visa from within the UK.

What steps can you take to prepare now?

The UK government has not yet released any information on the costs of the visa or about the digital application process. However, BN(O) citizens either inside or outside the UK should now consider their eligibility for the visa by ensuring they have access to a valid or expired BN(O) passport. We recommend they also begin gathering evidence of their normal residence in Hong Kong, in addition to documentation that demonstrates their ability to afford life in the UK.

How can we help?

At Newfields, we can provide individuals with a checklist of documents and review the evidence you gather to assess whether it will meet the BN(O) visa requirements.

Register your interest in this route by contacting us and we will contact you once further information about the digital application is released. We will complete the application for you, and we will liaise with the Home Office if they have any queries in respect of your application. We will maintain contact with you over the subsequent years as you navigate your pathway to indefinite leave to remain and British Citizenship, updating you of any regulatory changes that might affect your immigration status. Our support will extend to family member dependants and through our trusted networks, we will be able to refer you onto UK-regulated solicitors who can advise on other areas of law, from conveyancing and succession planning, to business and corporate matters.

Testimonials

Rugby Football Union

“Glyn has been instrumental in advising the England Rugby Football Union as well as many clubs on a wide range of immigration matters, and is always on hand to steer us in the right direction. He and his colleagues always respond promptly, efficiently and often with very little notice, which is essential in the fast moving environment within which we work.”

Tania Hoffman

Head Coach, Celtic Dragons

“Glyn and Newfields make the visa process seamless each season; from the moment we inform them of the signing of our import players to the day they arrive in the UK. Glyn has always given sound advice and I would recommend Newfields Law wholeheartedly”

Martin Bakole

Professional Boxer

“Glyn and his team worked tirelessly with Billy Nelson, the Boxing Board of Control and Home Office Policy teams to secure a sponsorship arrangement and set of visas for myself and my family, whilst accommodating my overseas boxing commitments. 10/10 for service and getting the result we needed!”

Brad Barritt

English Premiership and England National Rugby Union player

“Glyn provided a fantastic service to my family and I, they were professional, extremely helpful and very efficient, and were always on hand for friendly advice.”

John Mitchell

Coach

“We have had nothing short of exceptional service from Glyn and his team at Newfields. Their attention to detail for our visas was beyond anything that we had anticipated with every step of the process being made as simple as possible for us - even to the point where Glyn went out of his way after hours to meet me to receive my BRP. We couldn't have asked for a better service and have recommended Glyn to numerous other South Africans engaging in the visa process”

Matías Alemanno

Argentinian National Rugby Union Player

“They are really an excellent team of professionals, all the staff always willing and with good energy to help you and try to solve any problem. Highly recommended.”

Gareth Anscombe

Welsh National Rugby Union player

“With the help of Glyn, our visa applications that at first were a challenging and daunting prospect, were made straightforward and were done in a very efficient manner. I would definitely use Glyn and his team's services again.”

Gia Abernethy

Netballer

“Glyn and his team at Newfields have helped immensely through my visa application process. The ability Glyn has to explain procedures in terminology that makes the entire process less overwhelming and daunting was a huge help. I'll always be grateful for the assistance Glyn provided and the efficient communication he and his team provided.”

Eddie Jones

Coach

“Newfields did an exceptional job in helping us with our immigration requirements - very professional and personal with a minimum of fuss. I recommend their practice very highly”

Eloise Sohier

Presenter

“My experience with Newfields and Glyn was second to none! All of our correspondence was via email in which Glyn would reply within hours if I had any questions or concerns. I was very impressed with Glyn and would have no hesitation in using his services again.”

Bryan Habana

Rugby Union player

“The efficiency, professionalism and swiftness with which Glyn handled the situation I presented him with (at very short notice) was absolutely outstanding. I will definitely be using his services in future.”

Federico Fernández

Premier League football player

“Glyn was always available when needed and made our applications, which were time sensitive and very daunting at first, less stressful and more straightforward. Highly recommended.”

Francois Louw

English Premiership Rugby Union player

“Outstanding and efficient service for my family and I”

Jo Trip

Netballer, Saracens Mavericks

“I have used Newfields for numerous visa applications, and I am so grateful to Glyn and his team for their commitment and hard work to make sure each application was seamless. Glyn personally went above and beyond; efficiently communicating what was required, and taking the time to walk me through the process, making sure I understood each step. He made a very overwhelming application process a lot easier and a lot less stress!”

Mike Ruddock OBE

Development Director, Ospreys

“Glyn and his team at Newfields have been Instrumental in advising on a range of immigration matters. As part of my talent ID role at the Ospreys I recruit on a global basis. Glyn is always on hand to advise and guide me through each step of the process with a great deal of calmness and professionalism. Glyn and his team are experts in their field and their knowledge on all immigration matters is incredibly impressive. Glyn and his team are hugely supportive, friendly, responsive and professional. I would have no hesitation in recommending Newfields. ”

Rugby Football League

“The RFL have worked with Newfields on a wide range of immigration issues and have found that they have an excellent understanding of many immigration matters. Glyn is always available for both the governing body and the clubs to answer the most straightforward or complex query; his attitude and work ethic are outstanding.”

Wilfried Bony

Professional Footballer

“The service provided by Newfields Law is very professional, they are responsive and friendly. I particularly appreciated how speedily Glyn and Chloe dealt with everything. Thank you again!”

Don Armand

Professional and England International Rugby Player (Retired)

“We cannot describe how impressed we are with the work Glyn did for us. Countless emails back and forth to ensure that we had all the right documents in place. His detail was very thorough and knowledge of the goings on was very impressive. He was on call for any questions we may have had and this went a long way in stressful times when we needed just that extra bit of information. We are very pleased with the service we received and would highly recommend Glyn to anyone who needs his services”

Hadleigh Parkes

Welsh International Rugby Union player

“Newfields provided a seamless service – from preparing all the paperwork and personally attending the Home Office with me, through to returning all of my documents in person. Very approachable, reassuring and quick to answer queries – a great service for international athletes.”

Admiral Insurance

“With Admiral Insurance being a global brand with offices all over the world we have a lot of visa and immigration queries. We have used Newfields for a number of years now and I have found every interaction with them to be a very positive and helpful experience. The customer service they provide is second to none and I know I can always count on their fantastic service and advice.”

Ayaka Suzuki

Professional and international rugby player

“Newfields has supported me in the challenge of playing rugby in England. Despite facing difficulties due to the pandemic, Glyn has handled the matter promptly and professionally. With that great support, I am looking forward to a great start in the UK”

Sean Maitland

International and professional rugby player

“Very professional and makes life a lot easier, amazing to work with”

Jamie Roberts

International and professional rugby player

“Perhaps one of the most stressful things about moving abroad is all the admin around the visa application procedure. I was very fortunate that before and during my time in South Africa I had Glyn on hand to help with my application. He was extremely helpful and very professional, which certainly helped alleviate quite a lot of my stress! I would definitely recommend Glyn to anyone looking for assistance with their Visa application Abroad.”

Do you think
we can help?

Let us know what you need, and we’ll be in touch as soon as possible.

Contact us